Poderi Colla

The Story

The first time I tasted a wine from Poderi Colla was at a BYO Barolo party that we threw at one of our favorite restaurants in Los Angeles, Terroni. I was smitten upon first taste and had to visit the estate, which I did months later. You cannot write a better story for an estate than what you could write for this one. The Colla family has been involved in making wine in the Langhe since the very beginning of the 18th century. However, this is one of the newest estates in the region. It was started in 1994 by Tino Colla and his niece, Frederica, the daughter of the legendary winemaker, Beppe Colla, of Prunotto fame. What is most interesting about this estate is that given the experience of owning Prunotto for over 30 years and vinifying nearly all the great vineyards of Barolo and Barbaresco, instead of buying many different crus with the money from the sale, they decided to buy three very specific estates: A six hectare plot in what Beppe Colla considered to be the finest vineyard that he ever vinified in Barolo, a significant property that is home to one of Barbaresco’s great crus, Tenuta Ronconglie, and an even more historical site, Cascina Drago, which is home to one legendary Dolcetto wine that Tino claims will age effortlessly for 50 years. It all makes sense when you taste these three wines. There is something to be said to cast your entire lot on very specific plots of land after centuries of experience passed down from fathers to sons about the greatest vineyards of the Langhe.

Lay of the Land

The Langhe is home to some of the most famous wines in all of Italy. Its hilly area lies due south of the Tanaro River in the region of Piedmont, Northern Italy. Here we find the two zones recognized as the King and Queen of Nebbiolo, “Barolo” and “Barbaresco.” Barbaresco is situated just 3 km northeast of Barolo and is composed primarily of calcareous marl. Though the area is divided into three, Barbaresco, Neive and Treiso, the soil and climate is relatively uniform, creating a more consistent quality between them. Barolo, on the other hand, is composed of 11 communities (5 significant ones) that vary drastically in microclimates and soils. The zone is cooler and higher in altitude than Barbaresco and the development of the Nebbiolo grape can differ based on its exposition. Parts of Barolo, like Serralunga d’Alba and Monforte d’Alba are compact, calcium-rich, sandstone soils that create a more structured and tannic expression of Nebbiolo. More western communities, like Barolo and La Morra have soils more similar to the Barbaresco zone. And, of course, Castiglioni Falletto, always stuck in the middle, combines the best of both worlds. Regardless of the zone, these powerful wines are noted for their complexity ability to age over most other wines in the world.

Barolo Bussia
Barolo Bussia

Poderi Colla - 2013 Barolo, Bussia “Dardi le Rose” Magnum

Price: $162.00
Size: 1500ml
Availability:

22 in stock

Type of Wine: Red
Style: Rustic, Elegant and Aromatic
Please note that shipping cost for Magnums is double the price than a regular bottle.

Inside the Bottle:  My first smell of Poderi Colla’s Barolo Dardi le Rose was mesmerizing.  I tasted a 2001 vintage of it in Los Angeles at a BYO Barolo event.  In the company of Barolo juggernauts like Giacomo Conterno, Cavallotto, Giacosa, both Mascarellos and many more, this wine of sublime finesse went straight to the top of my list, as it did with many other talented sommeliers in the room.

Few things are more thrilling than tasting one of the world’s greatest wines for the first time.  With the help of Alfio Cavallotto, one of the greatest winemakers in Barolo, and one of the Colla’s biggest fans, an appointment with the Collas was arranged.  Our visit with the Colla family was one of the most memorable I’ve had at any estate in Europe.  Tino Colla and I hit it off immediately, and before long we began selling their wines.

The Poderi Colla Bussia “Dardi le Rose” comes from one of the most venerable houses in the Langhe.  With over 300 years of experience, the Colla family, former owners of Prunotto (during their most legendary years, 1956 to 1994) began their first family estate, Poderi Colla, in 1994.  While they strive to make wines of finesse and polish they don’t compromise Barolo’s capability for great ageability and deep complexity.

This wine is a stunner, expressing classic aromas of dried rose and orange peel, sour cherries, tobacco and leather that beckon your nose as far into the glass as it can go. The subtlety of the wine is extraordinary for a young Barolo and can be matched only by a few of the greats, like Guisseppe Mascarello’s Monprivato. Aromatically, the wine offers a brilliant constellation of classic Barolo scents. On the palate, the typically stern tannins of a young Barolo are finely polished and are buoyed by the refreshing acidity from the site’s high elevation.  The palate aromas mirror the nose and add brown earth, dried cherry, aperol, toasted cedar, almond flower and fresh porcini.  Floral and savory to the bone, this near masterpiece lends itself to a perfect Italian feast. One of the greatest wines in our collection, this should be drunk when you feel the desire to lose yourself in a wine of pure Piemontese dialect and culture. You might need at least two of these.

Other Stuff: It was this vineyard that, in 1961, Bepe Colla (who at the time owned the famed, Prunotto) decided to make the first commercially sold single-vineyard bottling of Barolo. It wasn’t a random decision, nor was the accidental that when Bepe sold Prunotto, he put all of his money for Barolo on this cru.

The Dardi le Rose vineyard faces South to Southwest, at about 300-350 meters above sea level and is on clay, limestone marls and some sandstone, all a perfect combination for a great vineyard site. The wine is raised in large slovenian cask for a little over two years and is bottled without filtration.

 

The Wine

Inside the Bottle:  My first smell of Poderi Colla's Barolo Dardi le Rose was mesmerizing.  I tasted a 2001 vintage of it in Los Angeles at a BYO Barolo event.  In the company of Barolo juggernauts like Giacomo Conterno, Cavallotto, Giacosa, both Mascarellos and many more, this wine of sublime finesse went straight to the top of my list, as it did with many other talented sommeliers in the room.

Few things are more thrilling than tasting one of the world's greatest wines for the first time.  With the help of Alfio Cavallotto, one of the greatest winemakers in Barolo, and one of the Colla's biggest fans, an appointment with the Collas was arranged.  Our visit with the Colla family was one of the most memorable I've had at any estate in Europe.  Tino Colla and I hit it off immediately, and before long we began selling their wines.

The Poderi Colla Bussia "Dardi le Rose" comes from one of the most venerable houses in the Langhe.  With over 300 years of experience, the Colla family, former owners of Prunotto (during their most legendary years, 1956 to 1994) began their first family estate, Poderi Colla, in 1994.  While they strive to make wines of finesse and polish they don't compromise Barolo's capability for great ageability and deep complexity.

This wine is a stunner, expressing classic aromas of dried rose and orange peel, sour cherries, tobacco and leather that beckon your nose as far into the glass as it can go. The subtlety of the wine is extraordinary for a young Barolo and can be matched only by a few of the greats, like Guisseppe Mascarello's Monprivato. Aromatically, the wine offers a brilliant constellation of classic Barolo scents. On the palate, the typically stern tannins of a young Barolo are finely polished and are buoyed by the refreshing acidity from the site's high elevation.  The palate aromas mirror the nose and add brown earth, dried cherry, aperol, toasted cedar, almond flower and fresh porcini.  Floral and savory to the bone, this near masterpiece lends itself to a perfect Italian feast. One of the greatest wines in our collection, this should be drunk when you feel the desire to lose yourself in a wine of pure Piemontese dialect and culture. You might need at least two of these.

Other Stuff: It was this vineyard that, in 1961, Bepe Colla (who at the time owned the famed, Prunotto) decided to make the first commercially sold single-vineyard bottling of Barolo. It wasn't a random decision, nor was the accidental that when Bepe sold Prunotto, he put all of his money for Barolo on this cru.

The Dardi le Rose vineyard faces South to Southwest, at about 300-350 meters above sea level and is on clay, limestone marls and some sandstone, all a perfect combination for a great vineyard site. The wine is raised in large slovenian cask for a little over two years and is bottled without filtration.

 

About The Wine

Inside the Bottle:  My first smell of Poderi Colla’s Barolo Dardi le Rose was mesmerizing.  I tasted a 2001 vintage of it in Los Angeles at a BYO Barolo event.  In the company of Barolo juggernauts like Giacomo Conterno, Cavallotto, Giacosa, both Mascarellos and many more, this wine of sublime finesse went straight to the top of my list, as it did with many other talented sommeliers in the room.

Few things are more thrilling than tasting one of the world’s greatest wines for the first time.  With the help of Alfio Cavallotto, one of the greatest winemakers in Barolo, and one of the Colla’s biggest fans, an appointment with the Collas was arranged.  Our visit with the Colla family was one of the most memorable I’ve had at any estate in Europe.  Tino Colla and I hit it off immediately, and before long we began selling their wines.

The Poderi Colla Bussia “Dardi le Rose” comes from one of the most venerable houses in the Langhe.  With over 300 years of experience, the Colla family, former owners of Prunotto (during their most legendary years, 1956 to 1994) began their first family estate, Poderi Colla, in 1994.  While they strive to make wines of finesse and polish they don’t compromise Barolo’s capability for great ageability and deep complexity.

This wine is a stunner, expressing classic aromas of dried rose and orange peel, sour cherries, tobacco and leather that beckon your nose as far into the glass as it can go. The subtlety of the wine is extraordinary for a young Barolo and can be matched only by a few of the greats, like Guisseppe Mascarello’s Monprivato. Aromatically, the wine offers a brilliant constellation of classic Barolo scents. On the palate, the typically stern tannins of a young Barolo are finely polished and are buoyed by the refreshing acidity from the site’s high elevation.  The palate aromas mirror the nose and add brown earth, dried cherry, aperol, toasted cedar, almond flower and fresh porcini.  Floral and savory to the bone, this near masterpiece lends itself to a perfect Italian feast. One of the greatest wines in our collection, this should be drunk when you feel the desire to lose yourself in a wine of pure Piemontese dialect and culture. You might need at least two of these.

Other Stuff: It was this vineyard that, in 1961, Bepe Colla (who at the time owned the famed, Prunotto) decided to make the first commercially sold single-vineyard bottling of Barolo. It wasn’t a random decision, nor was the accidental that when Bepe sold Prunotto, he put all of his money for Barolo on this cru.

The Dardi le Rose vineyard faces South to Southwest, at about 300-350 meters above sea level and is on clay, limestone marls and some sandstone, all a perfect combination for a great vineyard site. The wine is raised in large slovenian cask for a little over two years and is bottled without filtration.