Domaine Collet

Romain Collet

The Story

Jean Collet started Domaine Collet in 1954, the heir of a Chablis grape-growing family that had been in the business since 1792. After the days of Jean, came Gilles, one of the funniest and most compelling personalities in Chablis. He is generous, lively, and keeps his personality from being as serious as his wines. In 2008, suffering from nerve damage on one side of his body, Gilles was forced to prematurely pass the baton to his son Romain.

At the young age of 21, Romain, had to take over the entire estate and make the decisions in the cellar. Immediately upon taking the reins of the operation, Romain started experimenting with organic and biodynamic farming as well as using natural yeasts. His relentless desire for improvement powers the future of Collet, which will be a dynamic force in the years to come.

Lay of the Land

Chablis’ soils are a combination of specific limestone formations known as Kimmeridgian and Portlandian with various mixtures of clay. This soil and its rocks result from millions of years of sedimentation of ancient, tiny oyster shells, and provide Chablis with its unique personality. One of the most northern appellations in all of Europe, Chablis is made exclusively from Chardonnay in a place so cool that it’s almost impossible to make good red wine. (There are exceptions to this in neighboring regions like Irancy and Epineuil where they grow Pinot Noir for red wine.)

While the name Chablis in the US has an association with jug wine, wine lovers know that it produces some of the world’s greatest whites. Its classic aromatics show a “flinty” minerality, citrus fruits, white flowers and dried herbs, while the palate offers a focused and powerful expression. Typically, the wines have tremendous acidity backed up with a smooth chalky texture and flavors of under-ripe white stone fruits and citrus. With age, Chablis can develop savory honey notes and become absolutely sublime wines.

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Romain and Gilles Collet find themselves right in the middle of two schools of thought regarding particular styles made in Chablis. One advocates for stainless steel tank aging out of the belief that the purity of terroir is best expressed unadulterated by oak. The other schools holds that Chablis needs oak to soften its taut acidic structure. The Collets compromise by using older wood barrels in their higher end wine and stainless steel with their most mineral and precise wines.
Chablis, 1er Cru Butteaux

Domaine Collet - 2014 Chablis, 1er Cru Butteaux

Price: $41.00
Size: 750ml
Availability:

Out of stock

Type of Wine: White
Style: Mineral, Medium Body

The Wine

Inside the bottle: The Butteaux is raised in a mixture of younger French oak barrels (none new) and a small portion in stainless steel. The Collet’s Butteaux is a smooth-talking, charming wine that intelligently wears many hats. Its universal appeal quietly tucks away its sophisticated wet stone minerality and other delicate notes behind its upfront spicy character and sweet honeyed notes. Watch out for this guy as he will charm you into drinking quickly and carelessly before he shows his best side.

Terroir: The third and western-most lieu-dit on the Montmains hill has the most upfront and rich appeal that is akin to one of the top premier crus on the other side of the river, like Fourchaume, Mont de Millieu or Montee de Tonnerre. However, the notable difference is that the soils are still strictly kimmeridgian limestones but also mixed with a heavy blue and white clay that is rich in copper (hence the blue color.) In the Collet’s vines that were planted around 1990, there is about 30% clay content mixed with limestone rocks that sit atop the Kimmeridgian “roche mare” 50 centimeters below. Butteaux is a special site that makes serious wines with charm and polish.

About The Wine

Inside the bottle: The Butteaux is raised in a mixture of younger French oak barrels (none new) and a small portion in stainless steel. The Collet’s Butteaux is a smooth-talking, charming wine that intelligently wears many hats. Its universal appeal quietly tucks away its sophisticated wet stone minerality and other delicate notes behind its upfront spicy character and sweet honeyed notes. Watch out for this guy as he will charm you into drinking quickly and carelessly before he shows his best side.

Terroir: The third and western-most lieu-dit on the Montmains hill has the most upfront and rich appeal that is akin to one of the top premier crus on the other side of the river, like Fourchaume, Mont de Millieu or Montee de Tonnerre. However, the notable difference is that the soils are still strictly kimmeridgian limestones but also mixed with a heavy blue and white clay that is rich in copper (hence the blue color.) In the Collet’s vines that were planted around 1990, there is about 30% clay content mixed with limestone rocks that sit atop the Kimmeridgian “roche mare” 50 centimeters below. Butteaux is a special site that makes serious wines with charm and polish.