Domaine Collet

Romain Collet

The Story

Jean Collet started Domaine Collet in 1954, the heir of a Chablis grape-growing family that had been in the business since 1792. After the days of Jean, came Gilles, one of the funniest and most compelling personalities in Chablis. He is generous, lively, and keeps his personality from being as serious as his wines. In 2008, suffering from nerve damage on one side of his body, Gilles was forced to prematurely pass the baton to his son Romain.

At the young age of 21, Romain, had to take over the entire estate and make the decisions in the cellar. Immediately upon taking the reins of the operation, Romain started experimenting with organic and biodynamic farming as well as using natural yeasts. His relentless desire for improvement powers the future of Collet, which will be a dynamic force in the years to come.

Lay of the Land

Chablis’ soils are a combination of specific limestone formations known as Kimmeridgian and Portlandian with various mixtures of clay. This soil and its rocks result from millions of years of sedimentation of ancient, tiny oyster shells, and provide Chablis with its unique personality. One of the most northern appellations in all of Europe, Chablis is made exclusively from Chardonnay in a place so cool that it’s almost impossible to make good red wine. (There are exceptions to this in neighboring regions like Irancy and Epineuil where they grow Pinot Noir for red wine.)

While the name Chablis in the US has an association with jug wine, wine lovers know that it produces some of the world’s greatest whites. Its classic aromatics show a “flinty” minerality, citrus fruits, white flowers and dried herbs, while the palate offers a focused and powerful expression. Typically, the wines have tremendous acidity backed up with a smooth chalky texture and flavors of under-ripe white stone fruits and citrus. With age, Chablis can develop savory honey notes and become absolutely sublime wines.

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Romain and Gilles Collet find themselves right in the middle of two schools of thought regarding particular styles made in Chablis. One advocates for stainless steel tank aging out of the belief that the purity of terroir is best expressed unadulterated by oak. The other schools holds that Chablis needs oak to soften its taut acidic structure. The Collets compromise by using older wood barrels in their higher end wine and stainless steel with their most mineral and precise wines.
Collet Chablis

Domaine Collet - 2017 Chablis

Price: $30.00
Size: 750ml
Availability:

Out of stock

Type of Wine: White
Style: Medium Body, Elegant and Aromatic

The Wine

Inside the bottle: This striking Chablis raised in stainless steel is a complex and straight wine. The poor soils on the backside of the Montmains hill give this wine tension and loads of minerality. When blind-tasted, it would easily be confused for a premier cru wine as its complexities are quite exacting and fresh. Indeed, this wine has textbook classic Chablis notes of flint, sweet lemon and the toasty qualities of the Chardonnay grape. It is a fresh and lively wine that has a nicely rounded palate, giving the right amount of pleasure. It is endowed with a strong palate impression due to the beautiful soils that if it were situated facing south, it would have been classified as a premier cru soil.

Terroir: Generally one could say that Chablis “village” wines are harvested off of soils that are not on the cap rock areas where you find primarily the Portlandian limestone, a hard stone that has very little topsoil for the vines. Chablis and its cru wines primarily consist of the Kimmeridgian limestone soils with variations of clay, marne and Portlandian scree. The vineyards for this wine primarily come from the north-facing section of the Montmains hill that faces the Vaillons hill just to the north. It shares nearly the same soil structure that you might expect given its neighbors, of Kimmeridgian stones and medium to low levels of clay. There are also some small sections through the appellation that give grapes to this wine but they are the minority of the parcels. The average vine age is more than 40 years.

About The Wine

Inside the bottle: This striking Chablis raised in stainless steel is a complex and straight wine. The poor soils on the backside of the Montmains hill give this wine tension and loads of minerality. When blind-tasted, it would easily be confused for a premier cru wine as its complexities are quite exacting and fresh. Indeed, this wine has textbook classic Chablis notes of flint, sweet lemon and the toasty qualities of the Chardonnay grape. It is a fresh and lively wine that has a nicely rounded palate, giving the right amount of pleasure. It is endowed with a strong palate impression due to the beautiful soils that if it were situated facing south, it would have been classified as a premier cru soil.

Terroir: Generally one could say that Chablis “village” wines are harvested off of soils that are not on the cap rock areas where you find primarily the Portlandian limestone, a hard stone that has very little topsoil for the vines. Chablis and its cru wines primarily consist of the Kimmeridgian limestone soils with variations of clay, marne and Portlandian scree. The vineyards for this wine primarily come from the north-facing section of the Montmains hill that faces the Vaillons hill just to the north. It shares nearly the same soil structure that you might expect given its neighbors, of Kimmeridgian stones and medium to low levels of clay. There are also some small sections through the appellation that give grapes to this wine but they are the minority of the parcels. The average vine age is more than 40 years.