Clos Salomon

The Story

The known history of this estate goes back about 700 years when a fellow named Hugues Salomon put their Givry vineyard on the map by making it a favorite wine of the Pope of Avignon and Henry IV. Today, the Clos Salomon is a partnership between the most recent heir to the estate, Ludovico du Gardin, and his winemaker, Fabrice Perrotto. Fabrice, an outsider to the family, started working with the estate in 1990 and was added into partnership not too long after the passing of Ludovico’s father. It is an unusual arrangement for someone outside of a family to be given rights to the land and title of a family estate in France. It shows how much Ludovico believes in the ability and commitment of Fabrice. They are both very conscious about treatments in their vineyards and don’t use any insecticides or herbicides. All of the work is done by hand, and the resulting yield is quite low, at nearly 2 tons per acre in a generous vintage.

Lay of the Land

The vineyards of this estate lie in one of Burgundy’s less well-known areas, the Côte Chalonnaise. There are five communes (Bouzeron, Rully, Mercury, Givry and Montagny) with varying production between sparkling, white and red, depending on the commune. Bouzeron, the northernmost village begins a little more than a 10-minute drive from either Chassagne-Montrachet, coming from the north, or Santenay, from the east. The Jurassic limestones reimmerge here and wind their way down for another 30 minutes by car to the most southern end of Montagny. The climate is cooler than the Cote d’Or, so the wines can be a little more fresh, lightly extracted, acidic and higher-toned. That said, there are exceptions, like the Clos Salomon Givry, which is proudly endowed with structure and full-throttle flavors from its gifted terroir.

Clos Salomon - 2012 Montagny “Le Clou”

Price: $38.00
Size: 750ml
Availability:

Out of stock

Type of Wine: White
Style: Mineral, Elegant and Aromatic

Inside the bottle: Montagny is in one of the lesser-known appellations of Burgundy’s region, the Cote Chalonnaise. Montagny produces only white wine from the Chardonnay grape. Chardonnay from this area has a different expression than typical white Burgundy from the famous areas in the Cote de Beaune or the wines further south in the Maconnais. They are more savory in comparison to both. On the palate of this greenly hued and acidic wine you will find classic Chardonnay characters of toast and spice followed by subtle notes of allspice or nutmeg. This wine doesn’t carry the sun ripe aromas found in Burgundies to the north and south but are laced with flowers, acacia honey, herbs, soft white fruits and notes of almond or hazelnut.

Terroir: There is a range of elevation within Montagny that starts around 250 meters above sea level and goes all the way up to 400 meters. The vineyard “Le Clou” is at the southern end of the appellation and sits around 325 to 375 meters. The advantage of the higher elevation, keeps the freshness and acidity intact and the potential alcohol low. The soils are also reasonably deep with red and brown clay, which helps to retain water in warmer years, as irrigation is illegal in France. The red soil is loaded with iron and gives the grapes a solid core of power. The backbone of this vineyard site as well as all of Burgundy is the limestone content. The limestone here is called Bajocian or “crinoidal” limestone, which comes from ancient sea animals that looked a lot like sea lilies. This limestone can also be found in some of the greatest vineyards within Burgundy.

The Wine

Inside the bottle: Montagny is in one of the lesser-known appellations of Burgundy’s region, the Cote Chalonnaise. Montagny produces only white wine from the Chardonnay grape. Chardonnay from this area has a different expression than typical white Burgundy from the famous areas in the Cote de Beaune or the wines further south in the Maconnais. They are more savory in comparison to both. On the palate of this greenly hued and acidic wine you will find classic Chardonnay characters of toast and spice followed by subtle notes of allspice or nutmeg. This wine doesn’t carry the sun ripe aromas found in Burgundies to the north and south but are laced with flowers, acacia honey, herbs, soft white fruits and notes of almond or hazelnut.

Terroir: There is a range of elevation within Montagny that starts around 250 meters above sea level and goes all the way up to 400 meters. The vineyard “Le Clou” is at the southern end of the appellation and sits around 325 to 375 meters. The advantage of the higher elevation, keeps the freshness and acidity intact and the potential alcohol low. The soils are also reasonably deep with red and brown clay, which helps to retain water in warmer years, as irrigation is illegal in France. The red soil is loaded with iron and gives the grapes a solid core of power. The backbone of this vineyard site as well as all of Burgundy is the limestone content. The limestone here is called Bajocian or “crinoidal” limestone, which comes from ancient sea animals that looked a lot like sea lilies. This limestone can also be found in some of the greatest vineyards within Burgundy.

About The Wine

Inside the bottle: Montagny is in one of the lesser-known appellations of Burgundy’s region, the Cote Chalonnaise. Montagny produces only white wine from the Chardonnay grape. Chardonnay from this area has a different expression than typical white Burgundy from the famous areas in the Cote de Beaune or the wines further south in the Maconnais. They are more savory in comparison to both. On the palate of this greenly hued and acidic wine you will find classic Chardonnay characters of toast and spice followed by subtle notes of allspice or nutmeg. This wine doesn’t carry the sun ripe aromas found in Burgundies to the north and south but are laced with flowers, acacia honey, herbs, soft white fruits and notes of almond or hazelnut.

Terroir: There is a range of elevation within Montagny that starts around 250 meters above sea level and goes all the way up to 400 meters. The vineyard “Le Clou” is at the southern end of the appellation and sits around 325 to 375 meters. The advantage of the higher elevation, keeps the freshness and acidity intact and the potential alcohol low. The soils are also reasonably deep with red and brown clay, which helps to retain water in warmer years, as irrigation is illegal in France. The red soil is loaded with iron and gives the grapes a solid core of power. The backbone of this vineyard site as well as all of Burgundy is the limestone content. The limestone here is called Bajocian or “crinoidal” limestone, which comes from ancient sea animals that looked a lot like sea lilies. This limestone can also be found in some of the greatest vineyards within Burgundy.